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January 7, 2020

Pac Man 3D Breakdown – Behind The Scenes of an Animation

hey hey hey my fellow gaming lovers! How are you doing today? Hope you have been playing with all your favourite games!

In today’s article I want to share with you one of my Behind the Scenes videos where I showcase a little bit of what goes on into the process of 3D animation. I bet you are excited to see it, so what are we waiting for?! Let us dive right in!

Here below you can watch the full video embedded directly from my You Tube channel. Hope you enjoy it!

 

If you are curious to know more about animation and 3D animation please read below, thanks to WikiPedia!

Computer animation is the process used for digitally generating animated images. The more general term computer-generated imagery (CGI) encompasses both static scenes and dynamic images, while computer animation only refers to moving images. Modern computer animation usually uses 3D computer graphics, although 2D computer graphics are still used for stylistic, low bandwidth, and faster real-time renderings. Sometimes, the target of the animation is the computer itself, but sometimes film as well.

Computer animation is essentially a digital successor to stop motion techniques, but using 3D models, and traditional animation techniques using frame-by-frame animation of 2D illustrations. Computer-generated animations are more controllable than other, more physically based processes, like constructing miniatures for effects shots, or hiring extras for crowd scenes, because it allows the creation of images that would not be feasible using any other technology. It can also allow a single graphic artist to produce such content without the use of actors, expensive set pieces, or props. To create the illusion of movement, an image is displayed on the computer monitor and repeatedly replaced by a new image that is similar to it but advanced slightly in time (usually at a rate of 24, 25, or 30 frames/second). This technique is identical to how the illusion of movement is achieved with television and motion pictures.

For 3D animations, objects (models) are built on the computer monitor (modeled) and 3D figures are rigged with a virtual skeleton. For 2D figure animations, separate objects (illustrations) and separate transparent layers are used with or without that virtual skeleton. Then the limbs, eyes, mouth, clothes, etc. of the figure are moved by the animator on key frames. The differences in appearance between key frames are automatically calculated by the computer in a process known as tweening or morphing. Finally, the animation is rendered.

For 3D animations, all frames must be rendered after the modeling is complete. For 2D vector animations, the rendering process is the key frame illustration process, while tweened frames are rendered as needed. For pre-recorded presentations, the rendered frames are transferred to a different format or medium, like digital video. The frames may also be rendered in real time as they are presented to the end-user audience. Low bandwidth animations transmitted via the internet (e.g. Adobe Flash, X3D) often use software on the end-users computer to render in real time as an alternative to streaming or pre-loaded high bandwidth animations.

I hope you enjoyed this article about a 3D animation breakdown. If you did, please let me know in the comment section below and share it with a fellow gamer! It would mean the world to me!

As usual, you can reach me through my YouTube channel : https://www.youtube.com/user/TonyyMontana88

or directly on my Tik Tok account: https://www.tiktok.com/@antonio.pacman

or you can find me on instagram : https://www.instagram.com/antonio.pacman/

and Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/pacmanisabadguy/

Looking forward to hearing from you and happy gaming! Waka Waka!

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